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Your Tax Dollars at Work

Voters in the Edmonds School District communities of Brier, Edmonds, Lynnwood, Mountlake Terrace, Woodway, and portions of unincorporated Snohomish County support local levy and bond measures.

 

What have voters in the Edmonds School District approved in recent years?

Voters approved the:

  • 2014 School Programs and Operation Levy (expires 2018),
  • 2014 Capital Construction Bond,
  • 2012 Technology/Capital Levy (expires 2016),
  • 2010 School Programs and Operation Levy (expires 2014),
  • 2010 Supplemental School Programs and Operation Levy (expires 2014),
  • 2008 Technology/Capital Levy (expires 2012), and
  • 2006 Capital Construction Bond.

More information about each of these measures, and how the funds are being used, is available within the links on the left side of the screen.

Some commonly asked questions include:

Why do Washington State school districts have local levy and bond measures?
People want their local schools to provide better programs and services than what is possible when only funded by the state. In order to continue programs and services, the law requires that these replacement levies be renewed by voters.

Additionally, the state does not provide adequate funding for technology and capital facilities, and the law allows local school districts to seek local funding to support these areas.

What does our School Programs and Operation Levy fund?

The School Programs and Operation Levy represents approximately 20 percent of the District’s total general operating budget. These funds allow the District to provide local support for: teachers to keep class sizes smaller; paraeducators and staff who support the educational program; textbooks and instructional materials; student transportation (above state funding); athletics; music; co-curricular activities; services for special-needs students; support for programs, services, and technology; and staff training.

What does our Technology/Capital Levy fund?

The Technology/Capital Levy provides funding for technology tools for student learning and capital facilities. Currently these funds provide local support for: replacing older equipment; infrastructure upgrades to meet electrical needs; districtwide safety and emergency preparedness; districtwide energy efficiency improvements; system upgrades and asset protection; and outdoor facilities/partnerships.

What does a Construction Bond fund? How is different from a levy?

A Construction Bond is financed over a long period of time, typically 12 to 20 years and can by law only be used to fund new schools; capital projects such as school modernizations, or the acquisition of property. The funds from a voter-approved bond cannot be used to offset budget reductions in the General Fund budget which funds teachers, textbooks, and other school program support.

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